skip to Main Content
Menu
Featured-claire-broughton-aotearoa-artist

Claire Broughton

claire-broughton-aotearoa-artistNATURE'S BALANCE

Self-taught artist, Claire Broughton first picked up a brush in 2002 and became enchanted with the flow and magical qualities of watercolour. She attended a workshop with New Zealand artist Susan Harrison-Tustain in 2010 which she found invaluable, along with all the support and encouragement she received from Susan. “She really helped me to polish the rough edges off my work, making it look more professional.”

A certificate in Drawing Nature, Science and Culture: Natural History Illustration through the University of Newcastle, Australia in 2016 provided an excellent understanding of drawing, especially botanical drawing which in turn has helped her to achieve realistic watercolour paintings.

register and subscribe

Subscribe Today

Read More
Featured-kerri-lee-gunter-aotearoa-artist

Kerri-Lee Gunter

kerri-lee-gunter-aotearoa-artistBorn in East London, South Africa, Kerri-Lee Günter has been in New Zealand since 2009, living in and enjoying the majesty of Invercargill. She gets her passion and talent from her mother’s side of the family – mum, grandfather and great grandmother. “As a child I was given books with blank pages and encouraged to express my creativity in them.  At the age of nine my mum realised I had a passion for art and decided to send me to art lessons after school and at 18
I decided to pursue my passion further.”

Starting with an Art & Design Certificate – 2007-2008 – at Buffalo City College in East London, Kerri-Lee went on to qualify with a Level 5 Diploma in Painting – 2010-2011 – at Aoraki Polytechnic in Ashburton, and also gained a Bachelor in Applied Media Arts – 2012-2014 at the Southern Institute of Technology in Invercargill.

register and subscribe

Subscribe Today

Read More
Featured-pam-crowther-aotearoa-artist

Pam Crowther

pam-crowther-aotearoa-artistPAMELA'S SOUTHERN SYMPHONY

Artists continually strive to bring a piece to life, to fill a canvas with something that personifies a thought or represents a feeling. For artist Pamela Crowther, this is the earliest part of the process. Just as a songwriter starts with no sound and starts with one part of an arrangement – as an artist, Pamela has to start somewhere too. 

by Matt Mortimer

“I begin with the largest shapes filling in dark and light areas, usually in one colour, mainly using a brush for this. I’ll then place another three or four colours to start with, using retarding medium on palette – then it’s mix and begin. My technique varies considerably. I basically follow my instinct.” This instinctive approach works well, as she then branches out into the work, on the way to a sometimes-lengthy process to create each work. “Colour, colour, colour – the desire to change the blank white space into some exciting, thought-provoking or sometimes just decorative. Starting the painting takes courage and the need to prepare yourself for mental stimulation and then, near the end of the painting, dealing with exhaustion.”

register and subscribe

Subscribe Today

Read More
Featured-gwyn-hughes-aotearoa-artist

Gwyn Hughes

NATURAL PROGRESSION

Gwyn Hughes’ father and grandfather used to paint and it was a natural progression for him to become an artist. Gaining a National Diploma at Wrexham College of Art, Wales between 1980-1982, he was excited to explore his creativity and find his own path and as most artists do, he took inspiration from all of the great artists he came across. Gwyn tells us his story.

I first came to New Zealand in the 70s through a joinery internship. I joined a band, secured a couple of residencies in Christchurch and stayed for five years. After moving back to Wales from New Zealand, I would pop into a gallery run by a local artist, David Williams. I started to draw birds and local landscapes, and paint watercolours, and I was encouraged to pursue the arts as a career. I completed my four-year Illustration and Design Diploma in two years. I have never been a great one for entering exhibitions or awards but know as an artist it’s how you put yourself out there. I have been very lucky throughout my art career and I have received loads of support from family and friends who have always offered encouragement and critique. 

register and subscribe

Subscribe Today

Read More
Featured-keith-snow-aotearoa-artist

Keith Snow

keith-snow-aotearoa-artistBy Matt Mortimer

Keith Snow’s journey as an artist is a literal voyage of creativity, navigating the ups and downs of artistic exploration of largely maritime painting. This is an apt parallel of his definition of his career to date. It comes as no surprise that Keith’s maritime focus is one birthed from a love of the sea and sailing. 

“It’s gone from an interest...to a hobby...to a full-time job, “he says. “To attempt to fill a need to create something of beauty and of longevity.” His background is one of no formal training, of exploring the depths of maritime journals and books. My ideas and inspiration are mainly from reading. Books about early explorers, emigrant ships, local fishing craft and more.”

register and subscribe

Subscribe Today

Read More
Featured-mary-sneyd-aotearoa-artist

Mary Sneyd

mary-sneyd-aotearoa-artistFABRIC AND THREAD

By Matt Mortimer

Artists of all types are often asked about their favourite instruments to make their creations. Music artists will have an instrument of choice that gets that certain sound, a painter may have a brush or easel they love and others, like textile artist Mary Sneyd – well, they reach for something different entirely. And her choice is…? “My sewing machine, because my work has many layers and it is impossible to sew by hand!”

This sets Mary apart from many who call themselves an artist, much like the clear difference between her occupation when she is not sitting behind her sewing machine. “I still work as a doctor/scientist three days a week and do textile art for three days a week or sometimes four - if I can get away with it! - so although I’d like to be one, I’m not a career artist.” 

register and subscribe

Subscribe Today

Read More
Lazy Sunday-barbara-uini-aotearoa-artist.co.nz

Barbara Uini

barbara-uini-aotearoa-artist.co.nzMostly a self-taught artist, Barbara Uini also studied illustration for a year at the Chisholm Institute in Melbourne, Australia. Serendipitously she happened to find an old tin of watercolour paints at the back of a dusty cupboard where she lived and at about the same time, was gifted a subscription to a monthly art instruction magazine. Barbara began to fill up any snatched moments by teaching herself to paint. The magazine had lessons for a range of media, but she focused on the watercolour tutorials at that point, because that was the art material that she had access to. And that is how she became primarily a watercolour artist. Barbara expands . . .

Becoming an artist has really been a lifelong process for me, and I love the fact that you are never finished learning and challenging yourself in art. I have always loved to draw, but I really began to take my art seriously about 25 years ago when I was a stay-at-home mother with pre-schoolers. I was enchanted by some of the illustrations in the books that I read to my children, and the realisation that I really wanted to be an illustrator is what set me off on my artistic journey. I was attracted to illustration because I love books and storytelling and the idea of telling a story visually really appealed. I also love the idea of working to a brief whilst still having licence to add nuances to a children’s story that are not contained in the writing.

register and subscribe

Subscribe Today

Read More
Wise Owl-carla-sclanders-aotearoa-artist

Carla Sclanders

carla-sclanders-aotearoa-artistBLESSED INSPIRATION

Born in South Africa and immigrating to New Zealand in 2020, Carla Sclanders is inspired by God. “He has blessed me with a gift and I am driven to portray a glimse of His Glory in all that I am able to create.”

She began with a pencil portrait of her daughter and was so pleased with the result that she began to do more family portraits. “My passion for art grew with every artwork I created especially once I started experimenting with colour pencils. Posting pictures of my artwork on Facebook lead to people contacting me for commissions and so my hobby turned into a part time job.”

register and subscribe

Subscribe Today

Read More
Featured-fiona-ehn-aotearoa-artist Copy

Fiona Ehm

fiona-ehn-aotearoa-artist copyINTERVIEW WITH FIONA EHM

How did you end up being an artist?

I’ve always had a deep motivation to create. Early on I pursued classical piano as my creative outlet – but found so many creative pursuits gave me joy and eventually visual arts won out as my primary form of expression.

What was your biggest motivating factor for you to pursue a career as an artist?

Creating art is deeply fulfilling. Currently, my primary career is in the Financial Services sector, however exploring my creative side remains so important to me. It keeps me balanced and grounded, and brings so much joy. There is nothing more rewarding seeing someone’s face light up when they find a piece that they connect with.

register and subscribe

Subscribe Today

Read More
Three-generations-sheelagh-mchaffie-aotearoa-artist Copy

Sheelagh McHaffie

IN FOR THE RIDE

A self taught artist, as her mother was, Sheelagh McHaffie has embraced her self discovery to art as a blessing, considering it a unique way to approach her passion.

Sheelagh was always drawn to the arts. As an only child in a pre-digital world, she would often just sit, observe her surroundings and draw. Having had a hiatus from her artwork for 20 years, after losing her mother and raising a daughter with ASD she found there were too many pressures to continue. “At the beginning of 2019 I was officially homeless. I had separated from my husband who was living in Australia, and had not enough means to support myself. I returned to NZ with my two children, aged 4 and 18, and the bags on our back. My mother passed away in 2005, so I was very much on my own. I had to overcome my own fear, guilt and judgement from others, and truly trust that I knew what was best for me. Starting over forced me to evaluate my life, I had finally been brave enough to put myself first but there was a huge hill to climb.”

register and subscribe

Subscribe Today

Read More
Back To Top
×Close search
Search