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Int UK Jennifer Evans 1 Aotearoa Artist Magazine

UK Artist Jennifer Evans

A ROYAL COMMISSION

Jennifer Evans received a commission to paint HM the late Queen’s corgis for her Silver Jubilee.

“I taught my husband on the train how to use the second camera: I set it on Green and continuous, my usual mode. We went to Windsor Castle, and met the Queen’s Diary Secretary and the Footman, who was OC Dogs during her absence. Thank goodness the Queen was not actually there that day, I don’t think I could have managed the social area and the unaccustomed nuances and curtseying requirements while concentrating on photographing each of the seven dogs.

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UK Artist Tony Feld

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Painting a variety of subjects from buildings to wildlife, keeps Tony Feld busy.

“But my method is very much the same no matter what I am painting,” he says. “I usually square up a picture, so draw a grid on a print of a photograph I am working from. I transfer that onto the surface I am working on and go from there. Quite often a complicated painting can take anything up to a month to draw out, even before I have started painting.” Tony’s painting of a leopard took a month to draw out and another five months to paint.

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UK ARTIST Russ Chester

Sheep shearing doesn’t rank highly among the topics that typically capture an artist’s attention. But it caught Russ Chester’s eye. The artist, who relocated from the north of England to Wales, has produced a series of paintings celebrating the craft.

“When I first moved to Wales I got involved with shearing on the farm where I was living,” recalls the successful oil painter. “I was gathering and wrapping the wool - I didn’t actually do the shearing because it takes quite a lot of skill to do that. It’s a yearly event. New Zealanders and Māori’s used to come over. It was a good cultural exchange. Local shearers used to have a circuit where they would start off in Wales, then go to Canada and on to New Zealand, returning to Wales. They would just do a circuit round the world, shearing. You would see these guys stripped to the waist absolutely dripping in sweat and crikey they’d get through some sheep. They’d have a counter that they’d click when they’d done one. Half the time they were just wrestling sheep. The sheep weren’t taking too kindly to it especially when there were rams.”

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UK ARTIST Danny Mooney

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When drawing people you would think it might help to actually remember their faces… What if you can’t remember them? British artist Danny Mooney suffers from facial blindness but finds that he can overcome this obstacle by focussing on other aspects of a person’s character, an approach that lends itself to caricatures.

“I can draw recognisable people with just a few lines without any real trouble,” he reveals. “I’ve been doing political cartoons. They’re an expression of my annoyance.  Cartoons are caricatures really. Say I’m doing a cartoon of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson… I can do the shape and the way he stands without too much effort. I look at a couple of other people’s cartoons of him and see that they all have little piggy eyes and droopy eyelids. For me the thing that makes Boris look like Boris is the hair, the round face, the fat body and the shabby suit. It doesn’t really need any additional features. That cartoon could be Donald trump or Boris Johnson. In order to produce political cartoons you have to stay abreast of the news but in order to stay sane you have to not stay abreast of the news! It’s a difficult tight rope to walk. I have always recognised people by their shape, the way they move, the way they walk, rather than by their faces. If I’m painting someone then those are the characteristics that are most important to me.”

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UK ARTIST Gerry Defries

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Gerry Defries, who considers himself a colourist in the impressionist style, has exhibited widely in England, America and France. He paints seascapes and landscapes in acrylics and has sold close to 200 works.

By Tim Saunders

During a stroll along the Thames he spied a laser boat; a small racing dinghy that he used to race in his younger day. “I took a photograph and painted it,” recalls Gerry, whose first cousin married a man from Wellington and lived there for five years before relocating to Auckland where they stayed for five years before settling in Melbourne, Australia. “It got selected by a gallery in Edinburgh and then it got moved to Glasgow. The same painting was also selected by the Mall Galleries for the Royal Society of Marine Artists exhibition. I forgot that it was already in Glasgow and couldn’t find it. So I spent the weekend producing another one. I then realised where the first one was, got that back and duly took it to the Mall Galleries. They sent a picture of it out to all their clients. One of the clients recognised the boat. The next thing I knew I got an email from this gentleman saying ‘you have painted my boat’. I thought ‘oh goodness me, I’m in trouble for breach of copyright or something’. He came to see the painting and bought it, went on my website and saw the other one and bought that as well. He then commissioned me to do another one.

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UK ARTIST James Lester

Successful British designer and art director James Lester left his fast paced life in London and became a full-time artist in tranquil Devon. After initial study James established a career in advertising and publishing, when he worked on many national advertising campaigns and magazines. It was throughout this time that his paintings were exhibited in various London exhibitions, including the Royal Academy and the Royal Society of British Artists. 

Born in Dover, Kent, James spent much of his early life among the chalk Downs and picturesque Weald of Kent. For hundreds of years this county has been referred to as The Garden of England with its gentle hills, fertile farmland, orchards and cultivated country estates such as Penshurst Place, Sissinghurst Castle and Hall Place Gardens. Historically the coastal houses here were used as a location to dry hops for the brewing process. Perhaps unsurprisingly the county is home to Britain’s oldest brewer, Shepherd Neame, whose brewery was established in 1698 but “there is clear evidence that its heritage pre-dates even this period” according to the brewer. Today award winning English wines are produced here, too. Magnificent coastal views and the world-renowned White Cliffs of Dover together with Kent’s rolling green hills and beautiful scenery provide an artist with plenty of inspiration. 

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Marc Mckinlay

 

Marc currently lives in Christchurch and has never had any formal training in art. He says his major interest in art stemmed from secondary school in Scotland, when he was selected to represent his school in regional art programmes.

“I like to experiment with colour and find inspiration everywhere. I don’t focus on other artists’ work but the vibrant art scene in Christchurch has inspired me to create more art in the last 24 months than I did over the last twenty years. Due to this, my art has evolved significantly in the past 18 months and I am now considered to have evolved a style.” 

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