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Uriel Tian

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INSPIRATIONAL FANTASY

Growing up in Barcelona, Spain and watching fantasy films filled with amazing creatures, Uriel Tian found the 1990s and 2000s a golden age for fantasy films. He was absolutely delighted to find the world he could create just using his imagination. This made him realise that he could do something like this and he began to direct his life toward becoming an artist. 

“I studied Practical FX (A practical effect is a special effect produced physically, without computer-generated imagery or other post-production techniques) for the film industry in Barcelona in THUYA Academy in 2012, and then I began my Sculpture degree in 2014 in La Llotja Arts School in Barcelona.” Loving the feeling he gets while creating and the freedom that comes with it, Uriel knows he can challenge himself to become better and better. “I like to have dynamic projects and I feel I could never get tired of working. That also makes me understand how powerful it is to pursue your goals and dreams.”

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McGregor Allen - Aotearoa Artist

McGregor Allen

McGregor Allen - aotearoa artist

Four years ago, McGregor Allen discovered one of his greatest passions and enjoyments in life: the malleable substance of clay. Through the use of various tools such as the revolutionary ‘Pimple Popper’, and small rakes, McGregor has moulded, shaped, and sculpted dull clumps of clay, then cast his creations in bronze to produce whimsical beasts that would not look out of place in a sci-fi movie. He also specialises in realistic figures and playful animals from all around the world.

Working for New Zealand Post during the day, and as a full time sculptor at night, McGregor has honed his talents to produce life-like, interactive sculptures that garnered widespread praise during an exhibition at Sculpture on the Peninsula. The Allen family was shattered when McGregor’s elder brother and idol was diagnosed with terminal cancer; it was an event that would change them forever. Despite the harrowing and at times overwhelming sense of sadness and frustration that comes with such crises, McGregor’s brother stayed strong throughout it all – encouraging his family to soldier on in the face of hardship, and to have as much tenacity and durability as a bronzed warrior; steadfast and resilient. Encouraged by his brother’s strength, and emboldened by his own anguish, McGregor carried within him the need to help his brother and, as an artist living in an age where communication with those near and far is just a click away, he knew he could make a difference. Enclosed in his studio, surrounded by his tools and equipment, he was determined to immortalize his idol and capture his brother’s memory through clay and bronze. “In my brother’s honour I have begun sculpting a Chatham Island Robin, which I plan to auction off with all proceeds going towards cancer research. With these Black Robins – my brothers’ choice of bird – buyers will receive a wonderful token from me to show our thanks for donating to an incredible cause.”

See more about McGregor here: McGregor Allen.

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Karen Taylor

karyntaylor-aotearoa-artistBorn an artist, Karen Patricia Taylor has always had a fascination with the human form which is often an integral element to her work. Driven by an intrinsic force where her creativity finds a happy balance within the flow of her artistic making, her work speaks of the feminine amongst a myriad of other creative explorations. Her early life was spent drawing and making, often copying faces from comics, “pages and pages of them” until this grew to include the human form.

By the time she was in her late 20’s she began to work with clay, primarily cut and altered slip cast objects. Slip cast objects are created when liquid clay (slip) is poured into plaster moulds and allowed to form a layer, the cast is left on the inside cavity of the mould and taken out and altered or added to as required.

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Millefiori

WHAT IS MILLEFIORI

Millefiori is a glasswork technique which produces distinctive decorative patterns on glassware. The term millefiori is a combination of the Italian words ‘mille’ (thousand) and ‘fiori’ (flowers). Apsley Pellatt in his book ‘Curiosities of Glass Making’ was the first to use the term ‘millefiori’, which appeared in the Oxford English Dictionary in 1849. Before that, these beads were called ‘mosaic beads’.

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Cherol Filbee

Cherol Filbee - aotearoa artist

A PORTABLE OCCUPATION

Cherol Filbee has been heading in the arts direction her whole life. She loves being an artist. “I am never bored and my work is portable. My husband Peter, a top croquet player, enters tournaments all over NZ and likes me to accompany him. He knows I am lost without a project, so the deal is that I take my art work with me. When he played the world champs in London, I enrolled in a five day portraiture class at the Heatherly School Of Fine Art.”

Qualifying from The Learning Connection with honours in art and creativity, Cherol studied part-time, starting in 2010.
Awarded a scholarship for every year but one, she explains that simply drawing has become the basis of all her work. “I love faces and like to portray them as portraits or caricature in 2D and 3D. Cats have also featured quite a lot in my work. I like to challenge myself and work from life rather than a photo reference.”

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Geoffrey Cox

Geoffrey Cox - aotearoa artist

FROM PLASTICINE TO POLYMER

Geoffrey Cox has been drawing and modelling all his life. In addition to illustrating books on wildlife and natural history Geoffrey has produced a myriad of work for museums, galleries and individual collectors.

While Geoffrey recalls making plasticine models when he was 11 years old. Things became a little more serious, while he was studying for a degree in zoology, when he was asked to make models for a prehistoric reptile display at the Auckland Museum. After this he was asked to illustrate ‘Collins Guide to the Sea Fishes of New Zealand,’ which was how Geoffrey’s career as a professional artist really started.

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